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Sweet Charity – Doesn’t Put a Tingle in Your Fingers

Bob Fosse’s original musical ‘Sweet Charity’ opened in 1966 but you will be more familiar with the 1969 movie version starring Shirley MacLaine. Based on Fellini’s ‘Nights of Cabiria’ and a book by Neil Simon, with music by jazzman Cy Coleman and lyrics by Dorothy Fields. It was a successful show in the late sixties.  I went to see the 2010 West End revival playing at the Theatre Royal, Haymarket and starring Tamzin Outhwaite in the lead role.  We are introduced to Charity Hope Valentine as she meets her new boyfriend, Charlie in New York’s Central Park – Charlie then steals her handbag and pushes her into the lake – starting off the string of events that leads to Charity failing, in ever more desperate ways, to achieve escape from her demeaning existence and find her idea of heaven … her ‘little white picket fences’.

The story is about the life of misery and disappointment that a girl has to bear. Charity is a taxi dancer at a Times Square dance-hall. Surprisingly, the ‘working girls’ like Charity in this story are more often than not optimistic, full of aspiration and expectation. Their hopes are so frequently and cruelly dashed upon the painful rocks of a life – that you would expect them to be cynical harpies full of hate for all men. But they seem totally unaffected by their futility – shaped for them by the total and abysmal failure of all the men that they meet to be honorable and trustworthy.  Men are always exposed as liars, cheaters, thieves, charlatans or selfish oafs. Men are pigs at the trough. And women are the feed.

You will recognise “Big Spender” the Shirley Bassey hit directly the opening notes blast out. This is the big show number that introduces the ‘taxi dancer’ girls at the “Fandango Ballroom” where Charity works for a pittance.  You know the song, ‘The minute you walked in the joint, (boom boom) I could see you were a man of distinction, a real Big Spender’.    Although these “dime-a-dance” girls are genuinely one step up from the hookers described in Fellini’s film, it is not difficult to assume that girls who offer the patrons hotter and more sensual dances, for their ten cents, get to fill their dance cards quicker and get to choose their dance partners. So the competition amongst the girls is to go the extra distance to grab themselves a good punter. They don’t pop their corks for every man they see !

Charity meets some ‘big spender’ Vittorio Vidal- who uses and abuses her. She meets shy Oscar Lindquist in a lift liaison (after a daft romp and a frustrating wardrobe scene with the big spender) and this relationship also ends disappointingly. She goes to The Rhythm of Life church under the bridge, where her life is not changed or altered in any way by the charismatic black preacher… so that’s another waste of time and effort. The story is just about the grinding futility of her existence and the relentless search for a man- it doesn’t matter whether the man is good – or bad even – Charity is happy as long as a man (any man) is willing to spend a night with her, because he just might be her ticket out of this place. She runs her heart like some kind of cheap hotel for no-goods and rogues … she has  “always got people checking in and checking out”.

The jazz and show tunes are great fun, but for most part, forgettable. The dance is hot and energetic. Tamzin was full of energy and fun and perfectly interpreted the two sides of the nature of Charity – the girly side, crushed, needy and mundane, and the get-up-and-dance side … the resilient business-woman who makes things work. The other female characters were portrayed in a similar way by the cast- some more severely cynical, others smarter, but they were all in the same boat. They were all used and abused.

The standout number in this show seems, to me anyway, to be set in entirely the wrong musical. The “Rhythm Of Life” song is introduced to us by Daddy Johann Sebastian Brubeck and Daddy’s All-Girl Rhythm Choir- and  ought to be in the musical ‘Hair’ not in ‘Sweet Charity’.   Even if you know this song (because it’s in your head for years after the first hearing) you will be surprised to find here. Sammy Davis, Jr. had a reasonable hit with this number back in 1968, and you will be humming it after the show, I guarantee it.  “The rhythm of life is a powerful beat, Puts a tingle in your fingers and a tingle in your feet, Rhythm in your bedroom, rhythm in the street … Yes, the rhythm of life is a powerful beat.”

Ultimately, though, this show is built on disappointment and futility. Charity and Hope are the two virtues missing from this bleak world. And without hope and success, the show ends, in my view anyway, on a sour note – and leaves a hollow feeling in the heart. The companion songs to the two big numbers are not strong, and the farcical situations are sometimes tedious, if not frustrating, for the audience.  The Theatre Royal was not half full on the night I saw the show, but the tickets started at £10.

If you like big song and dance shows, maybe you should try something else. But if you are curious about why this musical has been successful since the sixties – and you enjoyed the film – you could give it a try.  Just don’t spend too much on tickets  – unless you are some kind of a Big Spender!

© Neil_Mach
November 2010

 

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Kurran and the Wolfnotes – Redfest 2010

If you are one of yesterday’s men (or daughters) and you want to hang on to those past sweet summer memories then you will, of course, have enjoyed Glasto and Reading – but for those of us who want to celebrate the joy of discovering new talent and fresh sounds, and who wish to assess what is going to be hot (and what’s gonna be cool) in the years to come …… then there is no summer festival finer than Surrey’s Redfest. Now in it’s fourth year, Redfest has gained a solid reputation for show-casing emerging musical talent. And boy, did this year’s festival just roll out that talent. In abundance.

For example, on the main outdoor stage – that looked like a giant jesters hat in the rolling green fields- we had the alt/folk rockers Kurran and the wolfnotes.  Those smooth and shiny main vocals from Kurran were given splendid counterpoint from the gorgeous J-Lo look-alike on keyboards – the ravishing stomp-mistress, Natalia.

The K&W songs are complex structures, they are tapestries of sound. Churning waves of emotion given form and life by delicate strings, sweet harmonies and always eloquent and memorable tunes. Songs like ‘Your Four Limbs’ have a natural ebb and a gentle flow that stir up sweet emotions within the listener. But sometimes, just when you start to think that the structure of a song is sparse and fragile, great waves of brittle, menacing sounds greet you like a sudden summer storm. The effect is both exhilarating and breath-taking.

Lead vocals (Kurran – formerly K-Bomb out of ‘Trash Fashion’) ‘are ‘West Coast’ scenic and are reminiscent of Paul Simon – singing along with band Love. Sparkly guitars from Kurran and Tim tend to be from the poppy side of folk-rock – but there are plenty of generous sound structures reminding me of Fairport Convention.  Songs like ‘Set You Off’ tend to remind me of R.E.M  (circa ‘Out of Time’) and perhaps have a harder, leaner sound at times. The chugging rhythms and earnest steadfast beats make the happy Redfest crowd sway and clap in joyful harmony. Tribal percussion is beaten, thrummed, trampled and crashed out by Chris on drums (but never brutally) and is often augmented by other members of the band who cooperate to create a solid yet luminescent wall of sound.

A band to remember …

© Neil_Mach
July 2010

Links:

http://www.myspace.com/kurranandthewolfnotes

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