Category Archives: west end

Lucky Toppers – The Black Hats – Live Review – Staines Hobgoblin

Take three Elvis Costello types. Give them some twanging bass. Crank up the volume so loud it sends a thermic lance up your tender-loins.  Tighten up  the sounds with a heavy gauge torque-wrench. And you have yourselves ‘The Black Hats’. As dangerous as a night out in Hackney. Swift as a switchblade in steady hands. And as formidable as a home-made zip-gun. This band takes no prisoners in a bloody relentless surge for power.  

Oxford’s most articulate pop punksters played a successful show at the Staines Hobgoblin during the summer. They may look like yobs in “Proclaimers” specs or the remnants of a twisted “Freddy and the Dreamers” lookalikey party, but they play garrulously energetic punk at high pitch, high dose levels. And they sprinkle their sounds with seasonings of ska, dub and reggae. In this sense, they are our ‘most post’ protopunk pop-star popinjays. Increasingly recognized and well received throughout their home territory, they now seem to be branching out along the Thames Valley- and they are already creating quite a stir on radio. And they are just out of the studio, having recorded with Mercury-nominated producer Sam Williams (Supergrass, Plan B, The Go Team!)

A rattling & rolling gig at The Hob got all the good people in the audience moshing and prancing and, generally, yelling to the aggregate sounds. This band look like a bunch of rock-hard ‘leave-well-alone’ nut-case bruisers with psychopathic intent. But their songs and intelligent musicianship elevates them to a higher level. Yes, they may be a bunch of amoral, discontented antisocial misfits – wearing ‘Two Ronnies’ glasses -but they are also talented, effervescent with energy and almost academic in their production.

Their big number ‘Tunnels’ rushes & crashes-  it barely hangs onto the tracks- like some kind of out-of-control cattle car upon a flimsy trackway . Driven by a Liam Gallagher-style vocal from Nick Breakspear, the jaggedly highly-wrought guitar-work adds radiating spirals of sound to the bumpy rhythms laid down by Ian Budd on bass, and the generally rickety percussion from Mark Franklin on drums.

Other Black Hats numbers like ‘Magnets’ are creatures that can trace their lineage back to ‘The Jam’ and ‘The Cure’ via ‘Simple Minds’. Bippperty beats, slide around rhythms and cutie-pie slip ups, underpin the smiling yet ultra-cynical vocals and those acid laden vitriolic lyrics. Silvery guitars slice up the atmosphere and a catchy chorus adds to the joy of the frivolous, yet desirable, songs. Yes, indeed ‘We’re all magnets … don’t you know?”

And ‘Just Fall’ helps you feel your way along it’s twisting path with a reassuringly jammy sound. But the angular motifs and progressive bass notes create hazards and unseen footfalls in the dangerous architectural sub-terrain.  Two-for-one chug-a-chug chords get toes tapping. And echoing sweetly, lofty vocals from Nick remind me of Sting at his best (Reggatta de Blanc) and now, come to think of it, his reggae guitar tones also sound a lot like Andy Summers.

Crikey, there is a lot here to be thankful for here. The Black Hats are set to top-off and rise. This is spruced up defiant and infallible punk.

© Neil_Mach
September 2011

Link:

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Elton John -Charity Concert at Royal Opera House London

Still Shining A Light

You don’t spin a successful career spanning four decades just by wearing comedy spectacles and high-heeled boots …. Elton John has been at the top of his game for the whole period – as a writer, singer and entertainer.  He may just be a piano player from Pinner, but he is very possibly one of the best showmen that there has ever been.

Elton has been heavily involved in the fight against AIDS since the late 1980s. Since 1992, when he established the Elton John AIDS Foundation, the foundation has raised over $200 million. And in 2010, Elton joined Cyndi Lauper in the launch of her ‘Give a Damn’ campaign to bring a wider awareness of discrimination of the LGBT community as part of her ‘True Colors’ Fund. But less is known of Elton John’s charitable contributions to young musicians and emerging music – but he is an equally generous contributor to young music and the arts and especially to the Royal Academy of Music – in London’s Marylebone, which he attended as a scholar when he was barely 11 years of age. Elton regularly puts on charity concerts for deserving causes, and last year he raised money for a music organ for the Royal Academy of Music. In Jan 2011 he put on another show at the Royal Opera House to raise funds for the organ for the Academy – well it is a ‘really big organ’ he told the audience. (2,921 pipes)

Elton is essentially a ‘one man’ show (though his Royal Academy of Music charity concert featured the much admired percussionist Ray Cooper.) The honky piano and the gospel-chords are played with astonishing power and overwhelming clarity. From standards like ‘Rocket Man’ to ‘Philadelphia Freedom’ we also had some wonderful lesser known (but no less loved)  numbers like ‘Love Lies Bleeding’ and also some very contemporary songs from ‘The Union’ album, his collaborative work with Leon Russell.

A perfectly punctuated ‘Levon’ [Madman Across the Water] allowed Elton to thank his songwriting partner Bernie Taupin (of 44 years) for his friendship and skills. Then we shimmied over some lighter numbers to reach “Sorry Seems to Be the Hardest Word” from the amazing ‘Blue Moves’ album of 1976.

Probably the most enjoyable song of the night and an all-round winner with the rather posh crowd at this premier venue was the g-g-great song “Bennie and the Jets”. Gigantic slabs of chord were churned out by Elton’s pudgy fingers and the whole sound was punctured, perforated and powdered by the aerobic air-doodling and artistic percussion from Ray.  Naturally, we also enjoyed “Candle in the Wind” and the now ever-present “Your Song”-  which sounds so fresh yet it harkens back to 1970.

Ray first started working with Elton in 1971 on ‘Madman Across the Water’ and joined the ‘Elton John Band’ later that year.  Ray has continued to perform and record with Elton sporadically since then. This ‘piano and percussion’ concert was perfected by the duo in 1994 and they have now played more than 50 distinct performances together.

Elton’s tunes are all accompanied with surprising speed and exhilarating virtuosity, by cascades of sumptuous notes. And I don’t mean tinkly plinkety-plonky notes either.  Elton’s notes are big fat man-sized slugs of sound. Generous slabs of noise. The musical equivalent of a homemade sausage sarnies – made with thick wedges of crusty bread. Big coils of rope to hang a hearty song onto.

And what also surprises you is the amazing clarity of his baritone vocals- especially the seat-shaking low notes. And when these brooding sounds are accompanied by darker, more soulful piano pieces, the effect is very mystical.

Elton John is proud to be able to support the Royal Academy of Music and, just like his musical forefathers Sir Henry Wood and Sir John Barbirolli, he also hopes to  create new audiences and gain recognition for this amazing musical institution.

© Neil_Mach
Jan 2011

Links:

To find out more about the Elton John AIDS foundation click here:  www.ejaf.com

The Royal Academy of Music is internationally recognised as representing the highest values of music and musical society.
Click here to donate:  www.ram.ac.uk/giving

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Sweet Charity – Doesn’t Put a Tingle in Your Fingers

Bob Fosse’s original musical ‘Sweet Charity’ opened in 1966 but you will be more familiar with the 1969 movie version starring Shirley MacLaine. Based on Fellini’s ‘Nights of Cabiria’ and a book by Neil Simon, with music by jazzman Cy Coleman and lyrics by Dorothy Fields. It was a successful show in the late sixties.  I went to see the 2010 West End revival playing at the Theatre Royal, Haymarket and starring Tamzin Outhwaite in the lead role.  We are introduced to Charity Hope Valentine as she meets her new boyfriend, Charlie in New York’s Central Park – Charlie then steals her handbag and pushes her into the lake – starting off the string of events that leads to Charity failing, in ever more desperate ways, to achieve escape from her demeaning existence and find her idea of heaven … her ‘little white picket fences’.

The story is about the life of misery and disappointment that a girl has to bear. Charity is a taxi dancer at a Times Square dance-hall. Surprisingly, the ‘working girls’ like Charity in this story are more often than not optimistic, full of aspiration and expectation. Their hopes are so frequently and cruelly dashed upon the painful rocks of a life – that you would expect them to be cynical harpies full of hate for all men. But they seem totally unaffected by their futility – shaped for them by the total and abysmal failure of all the men that they meet to be honorable and trustworthy.  Men are always exposed as liars, cheaters, thieves, charlatans or selfish oafs. Men are pigs at the trough. And women are the feed.

You will recognise “Big Spender” the Shirley Bassey hit directly the opening notes blast out. This is the big show number that introduces the ‘taxi dancer’ girls at the “Fandango Ballroom” where Charity works for a pittance.  You know the song, ‘The minute you walked in the joint, (boom boom) I could see you were a man of distinction, a real Big Spender’.    Although these “dime-a-dance” girls are genuinely one step up from the hookers described in Fellini’s film, it is not difficult to assume that girls who offer the patrons hotter and more sensual dances, for their ten cents, get to fill their dance cards quicker and get to choose their dance partners. So the competition amongst the girls is to go the extra distance to grab themselves a good punter. They don’t pop their corks for every man they see !

Charity meets some ‘big spender’ Vittorio Vidal- who uses and abuses her. She meets shy Oscar Lindquist in a lift liaison (after a daft romp and a frustrating wardrobe scene with the big spender) and this relationship also ends disappointingly. She goes to The Rhythm of Life church under the bridge, where her life is not changed or altered in any way by the charismatic black preacher… so that’s another waste of time and effort. The story is just about the grinding futility of her existence and the relentless search for a man- it doesn’t matter whether the man is good – or bad even – Charity is happy as long as a man (any man) is willing to spend a night with her, because he just might be her ticket out of this place. She runs her heart like some kind of cheap hotel for no-goods and rogues … she has  “always got people checking in and checking out”.

The jazz and show tunes are great fun, but for most part, forgettable. The dance is hot and energetic. Tamzin was full of energy and fun and perfectly interpreted the two sides of the nature of Charity – the girly side, crushed, needy and mundane, and the get-up-and-dance side … the resilient business-woman who makes things work. The other female characters were portrayed in a similar way by the cast- some more severely cynical, others smarter, but they were all in the same boat. They were all used and abused.

The standout number in this show seems, to me anyway, to be set in entirely the wrong musical. The “Rhythm Of Life” song is introduced to us by Daddy Johann Sebastian Brubeck and Daddy’s All-Girl Rhythm Choir- and  ought to be in the musical ‘Hair’ not in ‘Sweet Charity’.   Even if you know this song (because it’s in your head for years after the first hearing) you will be surprised to find here. Sammy Davis, Jr. had a reasonable hit with this number back in 1968, and you will be humming it after the show, I guarantee it.  “The rhythm of life is a powerful beat, Puts a tingle in your fingers and a tingle in your feet, Rhythm in your bedroom, rhythm in the street … Yes, the rhythm of life is a powerful beat.”

Ultimately, though, this show is built on disappointment and futility. Charity and Hope are the two virtues missing from this bleak world. And without hope and success, the show ends, in my view anyway, on a sour note – and leaves a hollow feeling in the heart. The companion songs to the two big numbers are not strong, and the farcical situations are sometimes tedious, if not frustrating, for the audience.  The Theatre Royal was not half full on the night I saw the show, but the tickets started at £10.

If you like big song and dance shows, maybe you should try something else. But if you are curious about why this musical has been successful since the sixties – and you enjoyed the film – you could give it a try.  Just don’t spend too much on tickets  – unless you are some kind of a Big Spender!

© Neil_Mach
November 2010

 

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Hair – The Musical – Gielgud Theatre, London

Hair – Gielgud Theatre

Be sure to wear some flowers in your hair …

It was a perfect spring afternoon in London when I went to see this new Diane Paulus production of the iconic swinging sixties musical “Hair” starring American 2009 Tony Award ® winning actor Will Swenson (Berger) along with Tony ®  nominated actor Gavin Creel  (Claude). I spent the afternoon in a pleasant amble around in Soho – browsing in Carnaby Street – before going to the Gielgud Theatre and revisiting my misspent youth. It brought back some kind memories for me.  I was one of the hated  ‘tribe’ of hippies.  I remember my Dad telling me not to go out in the street wearing my love beads around my neck because they made me  “look like a proper poof”  (his words).  Ah the sixties! This musical takes me back.  I also remember when I finally cut my hair (like the character Claude has to do) and the look of sadness upon my father’s face when he realized that the free and innocent creature he had once loved was gone forever. It is an irony of the age that men and women like my Dad fought in the Second World War for freedom and for love yet looked on in despair when the fruits of that hard won freedom was a generation that was actually acting ‘freely’ – protesting against the ‘rules’ of a regimented society (in a gentle non-confrontational way) and seeking approval for their mantras of love, peace and harmony and the ‘abandonment’ of the materialistic world

There have been several attempts to reincarnate this rock musical – most fail – but this is, I believe, the right time to re-watch those hippies and what they represented and to sit back and enjoy the show.  Although I was familiar with the musical,  I was still surprised at how everything seemed to be so relevant.  Subjects stand out like anti-war, pro-drugs, the results of ‘guilt free love’ and racial harmony and all have currency today.  It is worth remembering how important and innovative this show was originally, with black and white actors on stage at the same time – sharing equal billing -long before anyone could imagine a man like Barack Obama would be living in the WHITEhouse.  Eventually, skin-heads, punks and a New Wave of working class culture killed off the ‘middle class’ hippies (contrary to popular myth they were not all exterminated at the Altamont Free Concert of 1969.) And this musical was lost along-the-way,  lost in the same way as our ideals for peace and love and our cheese-cloth shirts, cow-bells and Afghan coats.  But the legacy of the Hippie culture still lives on and is found in environmental consciousness,  whole food shops, music festivals, new age travellers, sexual liberation and tolerance,  LGBT communities, ‘world’ music, and even the journey into cyberspace.

Claude, and his mate Berger, like all their friends of the tribe, struggle to balance the ideals of love, peace and harmony against a backdrop of the Vietnam war and those conservative middle-class parents (like my Dad) who think that the kids should have a wash, grab a haircut, land a job and just bloody  well conform.   The story is based around the decision that Claude faces –  should he cut off his hair  and go to Nam or should he dodge the draft and burn his papers?   The consequences of both choices may well result in the ruining of his life (he may face a prison sentence for burning his papers – but at least he would be alive and unwounded. )  The tribe doesn’t have much but they do have  each other and they have got their shared love. So they make love not war.  And they ask us to give peace a chance.

“I got my feet
I got my toes
I got my liver
Got my blood”

The music by Canadian composer, Galt MacDermot – the Bantu beats and the funky rock n roll tunes, don’t necessarily conjure up memories of Sixties hippy music. For me, then, my music of choice was Jefferson Airplane, but I also liked the Jimi Hendrix Experience and Bob Dylan.  In the musical there is no psychedelic rock or hard blues – though the cast talk about it plenty. (Though there was a nod to Jimi’s Star Spangled Banner.)  Even critics at the time thought that the show music did not accurately reflect the counter-culture of rock. But the music of Hair is firmly in the tradition of big belting
show-tunes and musical barn-storming stompers.   And the songs are good. “Aquarius” still makes my hair stand on end – and “Let the Sunshine In” [ a hit single for 5th Dimension] is still as gob-smackingly beautiful as ever. Other stand out songs are the Blur-ish ditty “Manchester, England, England” sung by Claude and the blaxploitation songs of Dionne (Sasha Allen) black boys / white boys  (“ white boys are so pretty… ”)

In “The Trip” scene Buddhist monks, Catholic Nuns, Red Indians, Viet soldiers and even astronauts get involved in the slaughter of the innocent. It was no surprise to find that director Diane Paulus has also worked on dramatic operas like ‘Turandot’ because this scene and the ‘Eyes Look Your Last’ were visually stunning as well as emotionally moving musical masterpieces. Thanks must also be given to Karole Armitage for the breathtaking choreography.

Certainly, looking back, hippies were full of sh ** – gathering bits of religion along the way, with astrology and mysticism often as an excuse for sexual abandon, drug use and general laziness. Amongst the freedoms enjoyed during the Summer of Love was the freedom of nudity – and Hair still contains elements of this, but it now seems more artistic and almost twee against our modern ‘porn flick’ sensitivity.  Previous Hair nudists have included (in no particular order) Paul Nicholas, Richard O’Brien, Elaine Paige and Tim Curry. Meat Loaf, Curved Air’s Sonja Kristina and even Donna Summer and Liz Mitchell (of Boney M) in a German production. The full-frontal nudity in the 2010 version is neatly and appropriately performed, swathed in gentle warm light – just before the interval – just seconds long. If you are thinking of going to see the show just ‘for an
eyeful’  then think again- the nudity is – shall we say – tame, by modern standards.

I recommend this production for a loving, warm and passionate evening of pure entertainment.  Like the posters say, “Feel The Love” …

Let it fly in the breeze and get caught in the trees ….   Hair!

© Neil_Mach
April 2010

Tickets for the limited run in London
CLICK HERE >>

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Four Wheel Drive, Hard Rock Hell, Prestatyn

Danny - Tribal Law

Outrageous Fortune

Part one – Hard Rock Hell – Prestatyn

Imagine the pressure and the pain . . .  Our plucky high-rollin’ heroes are up in North Wales, Prestatyn to be exact, for the Hard Rock Hell III – for the gig of their lives.  They arrive early morning to find that the official 4WD T-shirt is proudly displayed in the Merch shop alongside shirts for New York  Dolls, Monster Magnet & W.A.S.P. and their concrete barrack-style ‘chalet’ is laden with gallons of booze . . .  it is rock n’ roll time and they are here to play a vast crowd on an immense stage at the biggest winterfest in the known universe. They are chosen ones and this is their moment.

On the official running order for the event the boys are shown on LAST on the Total Rock Radio big stage at 01:45am after ten more bands (on that stage) and after a heavy metal party that started the PREVIOUS AFTERNOON at 5pm.  So the stakes are high and the slots are tight….

During the day the boys wait patiently, gently floating on a sea of anticipation, excitement and nervous anticipation …. They don’t dare drink any of the moonshine in their Spartan chalet – or get involved in any fist fights or other harmful shenanigans because they need to preserve every inch of their energetic verve and spirit for their big moment yet to come.

Around Midnight the Staines’s favourite live band start to prepare religiously for their big show. They even miss seeing Monster Magnet and Sonata Arctica whilst they get ‘into the zone.’

Meanwhile the Total Rock Radio stage is being prepared for West Country southern-rock lads Tribal Law.  Soon enough these fun loving lads are bringing the burgeoning crowd to an effervescent climax with their zingy, zippy mix of twanging guitars and growling bass lines. It is all going so well that the Tribal Law lead guitarist (the Apache Koe Naiche) suggests to the lead vocalist and front-man Danny Adams that they do one more song.  The crowd is by now in a state of frenzy and is hollering for more. Danny doesn’t think so. “Stay around for the next band” he yells to the over excited crowd of rock fans “The next band is Four Wheel Drive and they are gonna blow your mind”.  The crowd erupts in cheers and applause.

Back stage the 4WD team are making their final adjustments to hair and instruments. A whole day of patient preparation and grooming is about to pay dividends.  The Tribal Law lead guitar kisses his turquoise feathers and says to the crowd and his band-mates  “Just one  more….”  Danny agrees, but with some reluctance. They start their final number, a blistering, searing bluesy finale. The crowd is going berserk.

On the final note, of the final chord, of that very final song I watch in horror as Danny, the Tribal Law lead singer suddenly and without any warning, keels over backwards onto the drum stage. He is a big lad and he goes down hard onto the cruel stage-floor. The crowd gasp.  The band chingles to a halt and band-mates Koe, Frazor Clubb and Jaymz Perry stare at the scene in disbelief. A stage manager runs over to Danny who is now laying stationary on the stage floor his head at a nasty angle against the fierce metal edge of the drum stage. I hear several members of the crowd saying “Oh God.”

“Get a medic, dial 999” shouts the stage manager to the security.  Danny is out cold and we fear the worse. He must have suffered severe concussion at a minimum – worse probably – possible life threatening injuries. Paramedics are called but they won’t take the risk of moving him… possible neck or spinal injuries. For a few agonising moments we think we have lost him.

He requires CPR and fast. This is becoming a nightmare.

The consequences of all this are that, by now, our West London Heroes 4WD are now on stage attempting to do a sound check whilst the paramedics are working on Danny. It looks grim.  Then the security decides to empty the arena.  Punters are moved slowly out.  And they are in a solemn mood.  Now all signs of fun and joy have been dashed. We wait in the big corridors outside the venue for about twenty minutes. By now Four Wheel Drive should be playing their hearts out to this big crowd.  Instead we are all waiting here in an eery silence. Another few minutes pass and a supervisor comes out to tell us the news.   The evening is over.  The party is a no-no. Four Wheel Drive are cancelled. The venue is closed. We are all told to go home.  “How is the boy who fell over?” Someone asks.  “I dunno”. Says the supervisor as he scurries off.  Shhhh…..iiiitt!

Visit here SOON for PART TWO of this story ….

If  you cannot wait for Part 2 and you wanna read the review of Four Wheel Drive’s senstational show at Sticky Fungus Staines in the meantime,  click here >>>

© Neil_Mach
December 2009

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Papa George & Steve Simpson April 16

Papa George & Steve Simpson Staines Riverside Club April 16 2009

papa-george-and-steve-simpson-apr1609

Papa George is generally regarded as one of the major electric blues musicians playing on the British blues scene today.

Although inspired by the Southern style of country blues that grew out of the Mississippi Delta and Louisiana his sounds and techniques also lean heavily towards the influence of the Chicago blues sounds reminiscent of  Muddy Waters – who himself became a success in the UK after an acclaimed tour in 1960.

Papa George’s style is characterized by the use of amplified resonator guitars or Fender Strat, picked or bottled, as each note is gently squeezed from soulful strings. His deep, great smoky voice is a mixture of honeyed molasses and Tennessee sourmash whiskey- sometimes dark and bitter as the cocoa bean, but most of the time, as sweet and as merry as a Piña Colada.

There is enough bitterness and maturity in and around Papa George’s chord progressions to ferment a state of melancholy in the heart of everyone in the room, without resorting to farce or fantasy. In his concerts, you remain firmly within Papa George’s world of blackjack back-room bars or windswept palm-fringed beaches but the settings and vibrations of all the songs seem authentic enough to  be recognisably rooted in West London and the English blues setting.

Papa George employs a more up-tempo style than many of his blues playing buddies (reminding me of John Lee Hooker) with a driving rhythm and a tendency to walk the bass pattern with his thumb- this especially nimble method helping to illuminate and add texture to the rhythm of the faster numbers. Papa George treated us to great big dollops of shoofly pie and soda and cream with cheery songs like Chuck Berry’s ‘You Never Can Tell’ and soulful numbers like ‘Moonshadows On Coconut Grove’. At times the sounds were as fiery as a string of Texas jalapeños and at other times as passionate as a fling on the Yazoo River. His fighting spirit is always served with generous spoonfuls of butter and cream.

Ably and competently supporting him, and taking some astonishing lead parts, was the loveable Stevie Simpson playing accompanying Strat or, at times,  his amplified Hathaway mandolin. Steve is a class-act in his own right, having played with all the ‘greats’ including Bob Seger and The Silver Bullet Band, The Atlanta Rhythm Section, and Ry Cooders’ Chicken Skin Music Band. His slightly higher and sweeter vocals helped to lighten the mood and his amazing finger pickin’ techniques and his overall clarity and precision meant that this duo put on an immensely tight show.

Although George and Steve took us on a voyage through the history of rhythm and blues, rock ‘n’ roll, folk, jazz, and even country it is their style of electric blues that is the most important lesson in musical history- as each carefully picked or bottled tune directs the audience ever closer towards the sounds we now take for granted in the genres of hard rock and heavy metal.

© Neil_Mach April 2009

Links:

www.myspace.com/papageorgeblues

www.stevesimpsonmusic.com/

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5 Things – This Week in Staines

1.

See Big Truck at Staines

Big Truck at Staines

Oct 12 2008      8:00P Staines Hobgoblin £3 entry

BIG TRUCK

BIG TRUCK are a young West London-based rock band. They have been established for just over a year now, having played almost 50 shows in and around the London area. In this time BIG TRUCK have not only recorded their debut album ‘One Long Saturday Night’ but also played a sold-out show at Camden’s Purple Turtle to celebrate its first press. Since then BIG TRUCK have been well received on many independant radio stations in the UK including Total Rock, Inferno and Brit FM to name a few. This was followed by a recent brief tour of Canada and airplay on UPV Radio 102.5 FM in Spain, proving that BIG TRUCK have both UK and international appeal.

BIG TRUCK are a four-piece line up with soaring guitars, driving bass, solid drums and choruses that have you singing along before you even know the words. They hail their influences from a variety of contemporary and classic bands – Foo Fighters, The Who, Muse and Jimi Hendrix to name but a few. The debut album ‘One Long Saturday Night’ is available for sale, along with some very stylish merchandise, through their website as well as at live shows. When asked for a quote about the band, producer and Nick Olivieri’s Mondo Generator guitarist Simon ‘Spud’ Beggs simply stated “BIG TRUCK rock!” No words have ever been more truly spoken. BIG TRUCK are now back in London promoting their album.

Their debut album OUT NOW! (www.bigtruckmusic.co.uk)

Vaughan Pryce-Jenkins // Vocals, Guitar
Jimmy “Fingers” Dockerill // Guitars, Vocals
Mark Kozlowski // Bass
James “Hands” Betchley // Drums



http://www.myspace.com/bigtruckmusic

2.

Catch some New  Acoustic Folk – Staines

AfterSpark at Staines photo by Ben Gray


Oct 9 2008      8:00P The Hobgoblin (Staines) Entry £3

Afterspark’s members Cate, Adam, Ed and Jude accidentally wrote some songs together at the start of 2006 and since then have played on radio shows and at gigs and festivals across the country.

The band plays a dynamic mixture of soaring vocals, foot stomping rhythms and subtle textures that range from the tiny sublime to the beautifully unflinching. They have an album ‘Sometimes We Forget’, self-recorded and self-funded, which you
can hear on the left, and they also have an EP ‘A Simple Life’, both of which are available from afterspark.co.uk

http://www.myspace.com/afterspark


3.

Great Works of Bach on Cello  at Walton

Paul Marleyn Cello at Walton on Thames

Wednesday 8th October 12.15pm Lunch, 1.10pm Concert  Riverhouse Barn

Suites Nos 1 and 4 for solo Cello, J.S. BACH

A welcome return to Canadian Paul Marleyn on a visit from Ottawa where he is professor of cello at the University. This concert is an opportunity to hear two of the greatest works for cello played by a fine musician.

–  full price £13.00
–  without lunch £9.00

riverhouse boxoffice
Manor Road
Walton-on-Thames
Surrey KT12 2PF

01932 253354 (24 hrs)

4.

Rock with Enjoy Destroy – at Windsor Firestation

Enjoy Destroy

Oct 9 2008      7:00P ENJOY DESTROY w/ CANTERBURY     Firestation Windsor

Basingstoke/Guildford Rock/Alt band

If you like Biffy Clyro or Foo Fighters you will love this up and coming local band. See them this week at Windsor’s new Arts Venue, The Firestation

Link:

http://www.myspace.com/enjoydestroy



5.

Rock and Punk at Windsor Old Ticket Hall

Scars and Sirens at Old Ticket Hall Windsor

Oct 8 2008      9:00P supports ALASKA & at Old Ticket Hall     WINDSOR

Scars & Sirens

Comprised of four talented musicians from Reading/Windsor, Joseph Spencer – Vocals/Rhythm Guitar; Lloyd Henning – Lead Guitar/Backing Vocals Matthew T.D. Rees – Bass/Backing Vocals ; Charlie Brown – Drums the hard-dedicated Sirens are
compelled to make their mark on the rock scene.

Once known as ‘The Otherside‘, the string-slingers prepare to take on their much anticipated challenge of producing the most powerful Rock tracks of the era. It’s here show how passionate we really are about our music…

Links:

http://www.myspace.com/scarsandsirens

http://www.myspace.com/theoldtickethall

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The Beck Theatre
Grange Road
Hayes
Middlesex
UB3 2UE

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