Category Archives: show

Little Shop Of Horrors at Magna Carta

Concorde Productions presents Little Shop of Horrors

This week we went to see the rock musical Little Shop of Horrors [music by Alan Menken] at the excellent Magna Carta Arts Centre in Egham put on by Concorde Productions, directed by Craig Howard.

Most people are familiar with the 1986 movie and recall Rick Moranis as Seymour and Steve Martin as the dentist. In fact, the film directed by Frank Oz features an assortment of recognizable faces.

The story first came to the public as a cult film in 1960…

This famous musical has lived an inverted existence… the story first came to the public as a cult film ( in 1960, with Jack Nicholson.)

This was later envisioned as an off-Broadway stage musical in 1982 and had a five-year run, with shows in London’s West End in 1983, then the big production movie in 1986 before finally moving to Broadway production.

The story is about a pitiful florist shop worker who fancies his glamorous but trashy co-worker, and raises a plant that feeds on blood and human flesh. The plant grows during the show and and although it resembles a classic “window-sill plant” cultivated by amateurs — a cross between a Venus flytrap and one of those avocados you try to grow from the stone — it eventually becomes a monster that dominates the entire stage.

The story begins in Mushnik’s Flower Shop in Skid Row where the audience is introduced to the miserly and miserable old shopkeeper (played convincingly by John Wesson.) The glamorous blond bombshell shop assistant Audrey (played by Georgie Glover) arrives late and with an injury on her face (it later becomes clear that the shiner was given to her by boyfriend Orin, the sadistic dentist played by Billy Reynolds.)

The plant grows during the show and resembles a classic “window-sill plant” cultivated by amateurs. Photo Credit: Concorde Productions

The hero of the story, Seymour (played by a lanky Christopher Blackmore who seems very Brad Majorish in this production) appears from the back-room where he’s been raising a little plant he discovered. It’s a surprisingly odd looking thing so Audrey invites Mushnik to put it into the shop window to draw-in custom. The moment they do, a woman comes in to enquire about the odd looking plant and, while there, places a huge order.

So the plant, baptized by Seymour as Audrey II [ voiced by Trevor Begley and with puppeteering by Shaun Lati] becomes a permanent feature in the window and its not long before it starts to bring good fortune to the store, and in particular to Seymour.

But, like a malicious genie, the talking plant soon starts to demand a price for the wishes it grants. And, because it’s a carnivore, the price is blood. To begin with, occasionally, its a drop from Seymour’s fingertip. But soon the cultivar gets more demanding and that’s when things get horrific.

An exemplary spectacle, a fun evening, and a slick show…

This was an excellent production with great staging and superior music. We loved the Phil Spector-style Peppermint Lounge singing group comprising of Ronette (Helen Tang-Grosso) Crystal (Julie Antoniou) and Chiffon (Cate Baines) and who drive the story and act as semi-narrative detractors. The dance (choreography by Honor Lily Redman) was spot on. And their inflections clearly accentuated.

Georgie Glover played the bimbo with a heart and she was perfect. She never let us down, although the moving aria, Somewhere That’s Green could have been given more prominence.

But our favourite song from the show, the duet Suddenly, Seymour, was perfectly rendered.

The music is largely rock and roll and doo-wop and seemed to be far more Jewish-sounding at Magna Carta than I recall, making Mushnik a recognisable Fagin character. The voice of Audrey II and the puppet-work was impeccable. The only truly amateurish scene was the final song, where the cast return with petals around their faces and was perhaps supposed to be a whimsical mockery of music-hall troupes, but actually looked pretty lame.

Photo Credit: Concorde Productions

There are several sub-texts lurking under the fundamental premise. One is the proposal that fame and fortune always costs. Sometimes the cost can be dear.

Another subtext is that when a man grows something its not so easy to control that thing and the thing can’t easily be pushed back into its container.

The story is also judgemental about the haves and the have-nots (although I couldn’t help thinking that if the musical was set in May’s Britain neither Seymour nor Audrey would still be employed by Mushnik or they would be signed to zero hours contracts.)

The other vituperative attack is on domestic violence and how, often, it’s the female partner who thinks she’s somehow “to blame” and finds it difficult to escape the brutality.

This was an exemplary spectacle, a fun evening, and a slick show. It had just the right amount of tongue-in-cheek humour and some excellent song and dance. Wonderful.

Words: @neilmach 2017 ©
Link: https://www.facebook.com/TheConcordePlayers/

Formerly known as The Concorde Players the friendly amateur dramatics group called Concorde Productions was initially for friends and colleagues of British Airways. Following the closure of the Concorde Centre in Heston, they have now moved home to the Magna Carta Arts Centre in Staines-upon-Thames, Surrey for their productions.

If you’d like to be part of their team both onstage and off you should contact them.

Sweet Charity – Doesn’t Put a Tingle in Your Fingers

Bob Fosse’s original musical ‘Sweet Charity’ opened in 1966 but you will be more familiar with the 1969 movie version starring Shirley MacLaine. Based on Fellini’s ‘Nights of Cabiria’ and a book by Neil Simon, with music by jazzman Cy Coleman and lyrics by Dorothy Fields. It was a successful show in the late sixties.  I went to see the 2010 West End revival playing at the Theatre Royal, Haymarket and starring Tamzin Outhwaite in the lead role.  We are introduced to Charity Hope Valentine as she meets her new boyfriend, Charlie in New York’s Central Park – Charlie then steals her handbag and pushes her into the lake – starting off the string of events that leads to Charity failing, in ever more desperate ways, to achieve escape from her demeaning existence and find her idea of heaven … her ‘little white picket fences’.

The story is about the life of misery and disappointment that a girl has to bear. Charity is a taxi dancer at a Times Square dance-hall. Surprisingly, the ‘working girls’ like Charity in this story are more often than not optimistic, full of aspiration and expectation. Their hopes are so frequently and cruelly dashed upon the painful rocks of a life – that you would expect them to be cynical harpies full of hate for all men. But they seem totally unaffected by their futility – shaped for them by the total and abysmal failure of all the men that they meet to be honorable and trustworthy.  Men are always exposed as liars, cheaters, thieves, charlatans or selfish oafs. Men are pigs at the trough. And women are the feed.

You will recognise “Big Spender” the Shirley Bassey hit directly the opening notes blast out. This is the big show number that introduces the ‘taxi dancer’ girls at the “Fandango Ballroom” where Charity works for a pittance.  You know the song, ‘The minute you walked in the joint, (boom boom) I could see you were a man of distinction, a real Big Spender’.    Although these “dime-a-dance” girls are genuinely one step up from the hookers described in Fellini’s film, it is not difficult to assume that girls who offer the patrons hotter and more sensual dances, for their ten cents, get to fill their dance cards quicker and get to choose their dance partners. So the competition amongst the girls is to go the extra distance to grab themselves a good punter. They don’t pop their corks for every man they see !

Charity meets some ‘big spender’ Vittorio Vidal- who uses and abuses her. She meets shy Oscar Lindquist in a lift liaison (after a daft romp and a frustrating wardrobe scene with the big spender) and this relationship also ends disappointingly. She goes to The Rhythm of Life church under the bridge, where her life is not changed or altered in any way by the charismatic black preacher… so that’s another waste of time and effort. The story is just about the grinding futility of her existence and the relentless search for a man- it doesn’t matter whether the man is good – or bad even – Charity is happy as long as a man (any man) is willing to spend a night with her, because he just might be her ticket out of this place. She runs her heart like some kind of cheap hotel for no-goods and rogues … she has  “always got people checking in and checking out”.

The jazz and show tunes are great fun, but for most part, forgettable. The dance is hot and energetic. Tamzin was full of energy and fun and perfectly interpreted the two sides of the nature of Charity – the girly side, crushed, needy and mundane, and the get-up-and-dance side … the resilient business-woman who makes things work. The other female characters were portrayed in a similar way by the cast- some more severely cynical, others smarter, but they were all in the same boat. They were all used and abused.

The standout number in this show seems, to me anyway, to be set in entirely the wrong musical. The “Rhythm Of Life” song is introduced to us by Daddy Johann Sebastian Brubeck and Daddy’s All-Girl Rhythm Choir- and  ought to be in the musical ‘Hair’ not in ‘Sweet Charity’.   Even if you know this song (because it’s in your head for years after the first hearing) you will be surprised to find here. Sammy Davis, Jr. had a reasonable hit with this number back in 1968, and you will be humming it after the show, I guarantee it.  “The rhythm of life is a powerful beat, Puts a tingle in your fingers and a tingle in your feet, Rhythm in your bedroom, rhythm in the street … Yes, the rhythm of life is a powerful beat.”

Ultimately, though, this show is built on disappointment and futility. Charity and Hope are the two virtues missing from this bleak world. And without hope and success, the show ends, in my view anyway, on a sour note – and leaves a hollow feeling in the heart. The companion songs to the two big numbers are not strong, and the farcical situations are sometimes tedious, if not frustrating, for the audience.  The Theatre Royal was not half full on the night I saw the show, but the tickets started at £10.

If you like big song and dance shows, maybe you should try something else. But if you are curious about why this musical has been successful since the sixties – and you enjoyed the film – you could give it a try.  Just don’t spend too much on tickets  – unless you are some kind of a Big Spender!

© Neil_Mach
November 2010

 

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Sally’s Hat – The Hobgoblin, Staines 6th May

Like their heroes “The Clash” Sally’s Hat experiment  with reggae, ska, dub, funk, rap, dance and rockabilly – creating a smooth pot-roast of greasy sounds. The band were playing the circuit some 15 years ago but recently reformed for what was meant to be a one-off reunion gig at the Ram Jam club in Kingston – but they reportedly had such a great time that they decided to try their luck gigging for the twenty first century boys (and girls).

Lisa Dimond is the lead vocalist with those sparkling sweet yet rasping high-tones and soulful, bluesy lows. Paul Worsley and Robin Dimond play guitars.The local Staines musician-cum-all-round hero, Ravi K, plays the bass and the great jazz/session player Dan Allsopp is on drums.  We catch the band at The Hob, Staines.

The result is a warming stew of heated hot patootie, yet level-headed, pitch-perfect grooves. You have those Aretha sounding vocals sprawled amidst some reliable Tamla chops. You have Cuban stomping. You have Dave Clark Five-sounding back-beats with Dusty Springfield sounding lyrical notes. And you get goose bumps when that sweet, sweet sound of reggae music bleeds through the amplifiers. You even get caught out by the skanky vibes of the two-tone Lee “Scratch” Perry type steam reggae . All in all this band is a great treat for those who adore sensible crepe shoes, neat creases in their two-tonic strides and earnest vocals from a legendary singer whose delivery is as smooth as butter and who has a range as wide as that enjoyed by Clayton Moore  (with Tonto.)

The first song out of Sally’s magic Hat was a groovy funk number, the second was a twangy Johnny Cash sing along song and after an enduring Franklyn cover I realized I was looking for a bit more passion and delivery from the band. I realize that the outfit is taking those awkward steps from practice session and friendly jam into ‘full on’ public performance – so I am happy to give them the benefit of the buzz.  Sure, this material all sounds nice and serious in sessions and rehearsal – but the punters want a performance- and The Hat don’t quite have the fizz or the frizzle to percolate our expectations.

Never mind. It was all reliable and resilient stuff.  Yes, maybe sometimes the performance lacked urgency or emotional involvement. But I cannot wait to see how this project progresses and I, for one, am glad to see this band back ‘in play’.

© Neil_Mach
May 2010

Link:

http://www.myspace.com/sallyshat

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Miss Pink Shoes – Jan 31 2010 Staines Hobgoblin

With the exception of the monotonous and frankly desperate 2-note bombastic instrumental intro to their show,  the Miss Pink Shoes set at Staines Hobgoblin on Sunday 31 Jan briskly scudded along some well-worn musical paths, bubbling and squeaking in all the right places – pausing rarely for breath – rising to levels of lofty achievement at times but also sometimes dipping to lewd and inappropriately low places at others.

Frontman keyboards supremo and lead vocalist Lloyd     (who shares an uncomfortable resemblance to the Police Academy character ‘Zed’  played by Bobcat Goldthwait ) likes to swear.  A lot. He also embraces the spotlight and gives a knowing wink to the audience to let them know he is in his rightful place upon the altar of rock.  He ‘plays up’ to the crowd, and he appears totally relaxed and ‘at home’ on his stage. And although the Miss Pink Shoes official song-book has a fair few ups-and-downs, there was almost at once a palpable sense of sonic relief at the Hob Staines as the band set about the task of soothing our poor sore eardrums … (the Sunday night crowd had just endured a set from the hard-core screamo band ‘Mother Hydra’  and their singer Chainy’s acrobatic antics.) As the Pink Shoes brigade paraded their well rehearsed set of melodic, poppy songs – always embodying some comic notions, and often concealing some tiny anguish or a hidden truth, a true ironic juxtaposition of sound and texture was revealed.

The highlights in the Miss Pink Shoes show were jaunty and wise, on the other hand the lows were often run-of-the-mill in their semi improvised slightly jaded state. But there were plenty of up and atom, bumping and grinding, moments of lucidity for the fans to enjoy – although I felt that the band often bridled back their real power, preferring instead to reel jauntily and loftily (at times) towards jeering and jostling levels of achievement without expressing their full musical intentions or ambitions.

Sounds snaked from traditional rock n roll doo-wop numbers like ‘Wobbling Violently’ towards Blurish indie creations like the track NIFLIB. All along the way the band delivered ‘grown-up’ somewhat less hip songs like the track ‘Love for the Hate Nation’ with industrious bass and guitar working together to provide shiny polished soundscapes fresh with feeling and energy. Percussion was delivered in sensitive quantities of rhythmic control. All the time, the synthy electronica keyboard work was well expressed  by the charismatic singer Lloyd who played centre-stage.

© Neil_Mach
February 2010

Zed - Police Academy

Link:

www.myspace.com/misspinkshoesofficial

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Four Wheel Drive, Hard Rock Hell, Prestatyn

Danny - Tribal Law

Outrageous Fortune

Part one – Hard Rock Hell – Prestatyn

Imagine the pressure and the pain . . .  Our plucky high-rollin’ heroes are up in North Wales, Prestatyn to be exact, for the Hard Rock Hell III – for the gig of their lives.  They arrive early morning to find that the official 4WD T-shirt is proudly displayed in the Merch shop alongside shirts for New York  Dolls, Monster Magnet & W.A.S.P. and their concrete barrack-style ‘chalet’ is laden with gallons of booze . . .  it is rock n’ roll time and they are here to play a vast crowd on an immense stage at the biggest winterfest in the known universe. They are chosen ones and this is their moment.

On the official running order for the event the boys are shown on LAST on the Total Rock Radio big stage at 01:45am after ten more bands (on that stage) and after a heavy metal party that started the PREVIOUS AFTERNOON at 5pm.  So the stakes are high and the slots are tight….

During the day the boys wait patiently, gently floating on a sea of anticipation, excitement and nervous anticipation …. They don’t dare drink any of the moonshine in their Spartan chalet – or get involved in any fist fights or other harmful shenanigans because they need to preserve every inch of their energetic verve and spirit for their big moment yet to come.

Around Midnight the Staines’s favourite live band start to prepare religiously for their big show. They even miss seeing Monster Magnet and Sonata Arctica whilst they get ‘into the zone.’

Meanwhile the Total Rock Radio stage is being prepared for West Country southern-rock lads Tribal Law.  Soon enough these fun loving lads are bringing the burgeoning crowd to an effervescent climax with their zingy, zippy mix of twanging guitars and growling bass lines. It is all going so well that the Tribal Law lead guitarist (the Apache Koe Naiche) suggests to the lead vocalist and front-man Danny Adams that they do one more song.  The crowd is by now in a state of frenzy and is hollering for more. Danny doesn’t think so. “Stay around for the next band” he yells to the over excited crowd of rock fans “The next band is Four Wheel Drive and they are gonna blow your mind”.  The crowd erupts in cheers and applause.

Back stage the 4WD team are making their final adjustments to hair and instruments. A whole day of patient preparation and grooming is about to pay dividends.  The Tribal Law lead guitar kisses his turquoise feathers and says to the crowd and his band-mates  “Just one  more….”  Danny agrees, but with some reluctance. They start their final number, a blistering, searing bluesy finale. The crowd is going berserk.

On the final note, of the final chord, of that very final song I watch in horror as Danny, the Tribal Law lead singer suddenly and without any warning, keels over backwards onto the drum stage. He is a big lad and he goes down hard onto the cruel stage-floor. The crowd gasp.  The band chingles to a halt and band-mates Koe, Frazor Clubb and Jaymz Perry stare at the scene in disbelief. A stage manager runs over to Danny who is now laying stationary on the stage floor his head at a nasty angle against the fierce metal edge of the drum stage. I hear several members of the crowd saying “Oh God.”

“Get a medic, dial 999” shouts the stage manager to the security.  Danny is out cold and we fear the worse. He must have suffered severe concussion at a minimum – worse probably – possible life threatening injuries. Paramedics are called but they won’t take the risk of moving him… possible neck or spinal injuries. For a few agonising moments we think we have lost him.

He requires CPR and fast. This is becoming a nightmare.

The consequences of all this are that, by now, our West London Heroes 4WD are now on stage attempting to do a sound check whilst the paramedics are working on Danny. It looks grim.  Then the security decides to empty the arena.  Punters are moved slowly out.  And they are in a solemn mood.  Now all signs of fun and joy have been dashed. We wait in the big corridors outside the venue for about twenty minutes. By now Four Wheel Drive should be playing their hearts out to this big crowd.  Instead we are all waiting here in an eery silence. Another few minutes pass and a supervisor comes out to tell us the news.   The evening is over.  The party is a no-no. Four Wheel Drive are cancelled. The venue is closed. We are all told to go home.  “How is the boy who fell over?” Someone asks.  “I dunno”. Says the supervisor as he scurries off.  Shhhh…..iiiitt!

Visit here SOON for PART TWO of this story ….

If  you cannot wait for Part 2 and you wanna read the review of Four Wheel Drive’s senstational show at Sticky Fungus Staines in the meantime,  click here >>>

© Neil_Mach
December 2009

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The James Warner Prophecies – Hob Staines

the James Warner PropheciesThe quixotic charm of The James Warner Prophecies is that their music contains a myriad of styles, oeuvres and impressions – much like J-Rock –  but theirs is less disposable pop in style and more harmonic indie in ambition. Thus we get thick slices of American Punk (i.e. think ‘Bad Religion’) laced generously with Brit indie folk sound reminiscent of ‘The Magic Numbers’.

So with The James Warner Prophecies you get melodic singing together with hardcore drum beats and haunting flute.  Yeah, I know it shouldn’t work. But it does.  Just.  Sometimes you feel poised on the edge of something a little too grand and opulent to be really honest …  but then the twinkle-in-the-eye  gentle humour of the band shines through,  and the result is an agreeable love fest of sound and virtue.

Benign Rasputin-like figure Joe Brown is the mighty front-man power-house lead singer/guitar of the band. Striding about the stage looking like a kindly ginger version of Edward Teach (the notorious pirate) – with an enormous burning red beard and a savage glint in his cruel eye. Instead of cutlass and sword, though, we get electric mandolin & guitar – but the results are similarly battle hardened with an abundance of inventive fireworks from the fret-boards and vindictive encounters with the spiteful strings of the mandolin.

Bringing some calm and beauty to the proceedings, Kate Rounding plays a mournful flute on many songs, plus the haunting chords on Korg. I understand Kate also adds violin to the mix – but we didn’t see her fiddle at The Hob. Lanky long-haired hippy Matt Anthony adds some low inventive and, ultimately, reassuring bass to the songs and the ‘Noel Fielding’ look-alike Dan Williams in assured and competent on drums.

The band moved ruthlessly from song-to-song keeping up the pressure and starting with an appropriately named tune ‘Braincell Piracy’ before launching into ‘King of The Killers’, then onto ‘Judas Stone’ and ‘The Itch’. The big end to the show was their ‘Set The World on Fire’ track (the unimaginatively named) ‘Mandolin Song’. This song has some fierce fretting from Joe (on mandolin) with audacious flares of light and fire from Kate and plenty of pounding crashing percussion from Dan and Matt. A truly exciting and heart pummelling joy of a song.

From my own point of view, I would prefer something a bit more languid and soulfully helpful from Kate (at times it seemed like her contributions were repetitive and almost go through-the-motions routine in content) and I would also like a little less sympathy from the band for the folk-country traditions of their home county (Derbyshire) and a little more hard driving rock from the ensemble … but that is just my personal taste.

Overall, though, the band makes a positive contribution to the Rock / Folk Rock scene. The band members are a jolly hardworking crew with a capable and naturally talented energy. I Strongly recommend that you see their live show soon.

© Neil_Mach
October 2009

Link:

http://www.myspace.com/thejameswarnerprophecies

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Rocky Horror Show- Woking Theatre OCT 22

RHSI have to admit I have been a regular Frankie fan for over 30 years but I must say that this production of the cult Rocky Horror Show is one of the best I have seen.

Starring David Bedella as Frank ‘N’ Furter who, in my humble opinion, is the best Frank since, well since Tim Curry – this touring production is essentially the same show as the 2007/8 show but with a few  tweaks and tassels here-and-there.

In this show we have Haley Flaherty as Janet (she recently toured in Mama Mia!) instead of Suzanne Shaw (from Hear’Say) … and if I am honest I think that Haley does a better job playing Janet – who has to transform from uptight hometown virgin to sexy vampish diva before your very eyes (similar to the character Sandy in Grease.)

Ainsley Harriott was our guest ‘criminologist’ (narrator) with his bulging eyes, chubby faced grin and none of the normal pomposity that comes with the character. As it happens, Ainsley did a very fine job and the crowd were delighted.  Magenta was played by Australian Kara Lane, and she played the character with more slinky, sassy style and a darn sight more sexily than I have ever seen before.

Bright-as-a-button Columbia was played by Ceris Hine. Our Brad on the night was  played by understudy Stuart Ellis and the small but perfectly formed Rocky was played by Dominic Tribuzio (High School Musical.) This glossy acrobatic Charles Atlas styled ‘monster’ bounced around the stage with enormous gusto. A nice touch was that Rocky first appeared to the audience as an ‘airfix’ model complete with Village People accessories.

It is hard to imagine that the Rocky Horror Show first came to the stage in 1973. Since then tens of millions of fans around the world have dressed up to act out, sing-along and heckle the actors in the show and also at special get together  film showings.

Nowadays rice and water pistols are forbidden in the theatres (but I once went to a production in Key West, Florida where the management gave each member of the audience  a large ‘party bag’ containing every prop needed for all the one-liners and the ‘in jokes’.)

But the show is not caught up in a celluloid jam- and this 2009 production is a spicy, fresh and frequently naughty jaunt into an erotic, freaky world … cool enough for the noughties audience to enjoy. It is a measure of the sophistication of the 21st century audience that the famous bed scene is now appreciated as a hearty joke for the whole family to enjoy, where internet-educated grans sitting alongside their teen grand-daughters, and chuckle along together to the sexual innuendos involving oral and anal sex and activity tantamount to rape. Back in the Seventies, when I first saw this show, the scene was considered to be shabby and scandalous enough to earn the show an ‘adults only’ stamp of disapproval.

For those of you who have not seen the show (and I was sitting next to two older ladies who had never seen the show or even the film before – so they are still out there)  the second half fairly zips along and is almost a ‘rock opera’ rather than a musical, using only songs  and very few words to paint the pictures. The band, directed by Steve Hill (Wicked, Mama Mia! etc) is above and to the rear of the stage (rather than in the pit) and this elevated position is also used for some of the solos and gives the stage the atmosphere of a sleazy club. The band was vulgar and bold enough to get the audience hot and alive and very much in the mood for dancing. The band pushed out the sounds in great waves when required.

The big numbers of the show are the famous Time Warp ‘theme tune’ (you must have heard that) and Frank ‘N’ Furter’s entrance song ‘Sweet Transvestite’ but I have always also loved Eddie’s ‘theme’ (in this production Eddie is played by Nathan Amzi) for it’s sheer joyful celebration of rock n roll life. “All he wanted- Was rock and roll porn. And a motorbike.”

On the weak side (I thought) were Riff-Raff (played by Brian Mcann) who lacked the ‘other worldly’ quality of Richard O’Brien’s character and whose voice was a little too wispy for me, and Brad – who seemed like a little lost bunny rabbit constantly dazzled by the headlights.

This show is definitely value for money and I guarantee that it will put a smile on your face and a glow in your heart for days and days after … … one of the striking things about this show (which explains its longevity and it’s loyal fan-base) is that it truly brings out the best in people. Folk are never happier than when dressed up in silly pantomime clothes and joined together to sing and dance to some doo-wopping, good old fashioned rock n rolling show-tunes.

Oh, and if you if you intend to catch this show as it tours the UK, please please make an effort to dress-up … even if it is just by wearing a red feather boa.  This advice is for your own good, because nothing, absolutely nothing feels worse than being the only ‘straight’ boy or girl (or as they say in ‘mortal’) at a Rocky Horror Show. You have been warned.

© Neil_Mach
October 2009

Rocky Horror Show
Theatre Royal Brighton

Monday 26 October 2009 to Saturday 31 October 2009

On Saturday 31st October at the Brighton Sea Front the cast and many, many fans are going to attempt a ‘world record’ for

doing the longest (as in distance) Time Warp … come down and be a part.  Don’t Dream It – Be it.

Mon 02nd Nov 2009 to Sat 7th Nov 2009
Hippodrome (Birmingham)

Mon 09th Nov 2009 to Sat 14th Nov 2009
Empire (Liverpool)

Mon 23rd Nov 2009 to Sat 28th Nov 2009
The King’s Theatre (Glasgow)

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